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Saturday, 15 September 2018

Garlic, Sounds in the Garden and Raspberries

What’s on the show today?

Garlic in the kitchen with Herb and Spice Guru Ian Hemphill, growing raspberries in Vegetable Heroes. Five senses-today’s it’s sound in Design Elements and more floral gossip in the Talking Flowers segment with Mercedes; today it's about flower allergies.

SPICE IT UP

Garlic
Do you remember a time when you refused to eat anything that contained garlic?
How things change as we grow older and as our taste buds develop.
Most of us would probably say now that apart from sweet dishes, we wouldn’t dream of not using garlic all the time.

But which is the best and can you grow your own?
Let’s find out . I'm talking with Ian Hemphill from www.herbies.com.au

Garlic's been around for thousands of years; even found in the Valley of the Kinfs in Egyptian pyramids.
Grow your own garlic, it's better quality. photo M Cannon
Fact or Fiction?
Garlic was known as "clown's treacle" or "poor man's treace."
It is a fact because "treacle" is an ancient word used to describe something that is used as remedy for all manner of things, including snake bites.!
Garlic has strong anti-microbial properties and is used as a food preservative along with food acids in manufactured food. 
Adding a little extra garlic in some products means that the manufacturer can use less food acid.
Sprouted Garlic?
No worries, you can use it but take out the green strip in the middle of the clove because this tastes bitter.
Did you know that the best way to release the health-happy power of garlic is to cut it, smash or crush it which then turns garlic’s thio-sulfinite compounds into allicin.
Allicin is an antibiotic and antifungal that is believed to reduce “bad” cholesterol, as it inhibits enzymes from growing in liver cells. 
Garlic Powder: Is It any good?
Yes it's good to use but only buy granulated garlic powder. If you do buy other garlic powder, check that rice flour hasn't been added to it.
Of course you can grow your own but stick to the cooler months of the year.
If you have any questions about growing or cooking with garlic either for me or for Ian why not email realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675

VEGETABLE HEROES;( or fruits)

Raspberries.

Do you ever find yourself drooling over the plant catalogues that display summer produce that you can buy, just wishing that you could grow raspberries?
The fruit of raspberries are one of the most expensive to buy but we love their fragile flavour and can’t resist them.
If only we could grow enough to make real raspberry jam?

So who can grow them?
Anyone who can grow apples, then you can grow raspberries so that maxim goes.
Did you know that Raspberries can be found in assorted colours including gold, black and purple, but red raspberries are the most common?

But Aren’t They Cold Climate Plants?
Technically yes, but there are varieties that you can grow in temperate areas.

How To Grow
Before even plant raspberries, you need to put in some sort of support.
I’ve tried teepees but they don’t really work for raspberries.
You can grow a single raspberry cane in a large pot say 40 cm diameter.
Use bamboo canes as supports. 

Raspberry supports:

Drive 2.5m  long and 75mm diameter posts into the ground to a depth of 75cm at 5m intervals.
Stretch 12 gauge (3.5mm) galvanized wire between the posts at 60cm vertical intervals.

If you’ve planned ahead, you may have already received some bare rooted raspberries in the mail.
Before you plant these, cut the canes down to 20 cm.

If you’re picking a site for the first time, Raspberries grow really well in moisture-retentive, fertile, slightly acidic soils, which are well-drained and weed free.

What Do Raspberry Plants Like?

  • They don’t like soggy soils and shallow chalky soils.
  • They do like a sunny position (although they will tolerate part shade).
  • Raspberry flowers are self-fertile and pollinated by insects, so avoid a very windy site.
  • Also, the fruiting side branches of some cultivars are very long and may break in the wind.


Pruning and training

Raspberry varieties fall into two categories: summer and autumn fruiting.

Summer-fruiting (floricane) raspberries - produce flower and fruit on year-old canes (the previous season’s growth)

  • Summer Fruiting:
  • Cut back fruited canes to ground level after harvesting in summer, without leaving a stub
  • Select the strongest young canes, around six to eight per plant, and tie them in 10-15cm apart along the wire supports
  • Remove the remaining young stems at ground level
  • Loop longer canes over the top wire and tie them in.
  • Then, in August, trim the long canes to a bud about 10cm above the top wire.
  • Tying the canes up in bundles can make them easier to manage.
  • The smaller autumn harvest will be produced on the tips of the primocanes and these can be trimmed to just below the fruit after harvest.
  • Autumn Fruiting:
  • Probably the easiest raspberries to grow are the ones that only fruit in Autumn.
  • Autumn-fruiting raspberries (primocane) – flower and fruit on the current season’s growth
  • Cut back all the canes to ground level in August.
  • That’s all you need to do with these raspberries, and for beginner raspberry growers, that is by far the best to start with.
  • So yes, cut all the canes back to ground level and the new spring canes can be tied up as they grow.
  • Reduce the number of canes slightly in summer if they get overcrowded
  • During summer also remove any suckers growing away from the rows.
Which Variety of Raspberry for You?

For those that are in warmer climates these varieties are better suited.

  • Williamette, Chilliwack Heritage and Chilcotin raspberries will tolerate warmer climates, apparently because they’re primo cane varieties that need lower chilling requirements.
Need to be grown in afternoon shade, or a spot that gets some sun on the south side of a house, shed or whatever.

Raspberry – Chilcotin
Heavy cropper, excellent fruit size and quality but can be crumbly at times. Good disease resistance.
Canes need to be thinned during growing season.
Mid Season: summer for 4-5 weeks with a small late autumn crop.

Raspberry – Chilliwack
Excellent fruit size and quality but may be crumbly at times. Used for fresh fruit, jam and cooking. Berries retain gloss and colour when preserved.
Mid season: fruit produced in summer for 4 to 5 weeks followed by a small late autumn crop. Good disease resistance. Canes need thinning during the growing season.

Raspberry – Heritage
Medium red firm berries, good aromatic flavour, excellent quality.
A low chill cultivar. Thorny canes.
Mid season: February for 8 to 12 weeks.
Use for fresh fruit, jam and cooking.

Raspberry – Neika
Delicate soft fruit with a sweet taste.
Early season: harvest November to December.
Large berry easily detached, good flavour,
Hardy with some virus resistance.
Early to mid-season.
Frozen, fresh, cooking or excellent for preserves.

Why are they good for you?
Raspberries are a low calorie, low carbohydrate, high fiber fruit that is good for you.
Raspberries are an excellent source of vitamin C, manganese and dietary fibre.
They are a very good source of copper and a good source of vitamin K, pantothenic acid, biotin, vitamin E, magnesium, folate, and omega-3 fatty acids.

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Sound in Five Senses Gardeneing
Ever wondered how to add drama to your garden with plants?
It’s easier than you think and won’t necessarily hurt the pocket.
You don’t need fancy whirling mobiles or wind sculptures at all.
Certain plants make sound when the wind whistles through them
Let’s find out about what, why and how.
Phormium tenax; NZ Flax makes a rustling sound.
I'm talking with Chris Poulton, Sydney Convenor for the Australian Institute of Horticulture and an experienced horticultural lecturer and consultant.

Chris says even the leaves of Gingko tree can make a sound when they fall onto a concrete path if it's been raining.
Gingko leaves photo M. Cannon
Yes, you can just pick out plants that will make a sound.
If you have got room for an oak tree or a swathe of Casuarinas.
Tall grasses are definitely ones to choose like Kangaroo grass, fountain grass, or carex .
Then there’s NZ flax and Nandina.
If you have any questions about five senses gardening or have a suggestion either for me or for Chris why not write in or email me at www.realworldgardener.com 

TALKING FLOWERS

Flowers and Allergies
The reasons behind the allergies
Allergyware.com reports one of the main reasons certain plants and flowers effect people with allergies stems from the plant's gender.
Monoecious plants are ones that have separate male and female flowers living on the same plant, such as a corn plant.

Because the male and female flowers are separated, the males, which contain the pollen, must send the pollen through the air to fertilize the female flowers.
Pollen grains travel through the air in their thousands and even millions, which is why people who are sensitive to this pollen get hay fever.

Plants that are dioecious ( different house), that have either all male flowers only or all female flowers only also rely on wind travel to pollinate these flowers.

Allergy sufferers may want to instead look for what is referred to as "perfect flowers," or ones that contain both female and male parts, like the rose.
This is the best option as these flowers don't need to use air travel to pollinate.

However, some people are sensitive to the perfume of flowers, in which case, the roses is a no-no unless it has little perfume.

What to Avoid
  • Most plants in Asteraceae family and that includes Daisies, Gerberas, Sunflowers and Dahlias.
  • Hybrid Dahlias classed as “formal doubles” have virtually no pollen.
  • You can also buy Pollenless Sunflowers
  • Baby’s Breath-although double flower varieties have much less pollen
  • Love-Lies_bleeding: _Amaranthus caudatus. 
  • Alternative is Chenille plant ( Acalypha hispidia)
  • Jasmine species, try sweet peas instead although it’s an annual.
  • Wisteria species-try Clematis instead.

I'm talking with Mercedes Sarmini
Video recording ( FaceBook live) on 5th September in the studios of 2rrr 88.5 fm Sydney, Wednesday at 5 pm.

Saturday, 8 September 2018

Dry Gardens, and Scentuous Gardens

What’s on the show today?

Gardening in dry soil with Diane Watkin in Backyard Biodynamics, a vegetable cross to grow in Vegetable Heroes. Five senses-today’s it’s touch in Design Elements and fragrant flowers in Talking Flowers with floral therapist Mercedes Sarmini.

BACKYARD BIODYNAMICS

Gardening in Dry Soil: How to Make Your Soil Healthy
Is your soil healthy and full of earthworms or is it dry, degraded with no sign of anything living?
When you pick up a handful of soil, what colour is it and does it run through your fingers like sand, or stay in a big clump?
All of these things are important to know but here are some ideas to help improve your dry soil so your plants will be more vigorous and healthy.
Let’s find out .
That was Diane Watkin, co-founder of Biodynamics Sydney.

Neglected soil, degraded soil, sandy soil, all of these possibilities add up to "lifeless dirt."
It's no good putting in a bagful of earthworms because they will surely perish as there is no food for the worms.
To encourage life back into your soil you need to add liquid in the form of compost eat, worm tea, seaweed tea or fish-head tea.
Chelsea Physic Garden photo M Cannon
Also you need to add organic matter in the form of organic or biodynamic compost.
All these things will bring back the microbial life and encourage earthworms to return.
For those gardeners not able to access bio-dynamic compost and any of the preparations Diane talked about, the second best alternative is to use organic compost, especially home-made compost and some sort of seaweed tea, weed tea, or similar.

If you have any questions about improving your soil, either for me or for Diane, why not email realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

VEGETABLE HEROES

Brukale: Kalletes

What do you get when you cross two veggies that have an image problem?
No, not a joke, but it could be.
Do you get a novelty, a passing fad, or a truly hated vegetable?
It could be any of these, you decide.
And you thought there were no more new vegetables.
So today’s veggie is Brukale.
Never heard of it?
Neither had I until I was asked about it.
A bit of research has revealed that it’s a fairly recent cross between Kale and Brussel sprouts.
For all those gardeners that love to eat Kale, good for you, but for others who have grown it and decided it’s not for them because it’s just too tough, this may be of interest.
Then there’s those gardeners that love Brussel sprouts, others that just can’t grow it well, and even others that just don’t like the stuff.
Probably reminds them of overboiled cabbage.
This is really Brukale or Kallettes
What is Brukale really like?
Can you imagine a plant that’s crossed with Brussel sprouts and Kale?
What would it look like?
Think of the actual Brussel sprout plant.
It grows to about one metre tall, with rounded blue-grey leaves that seem to make an umbrella at the top as well as growing along a thick stalk.
Normally you would get tight buttons that look like tiny cabbages, up and down the stem.
With Brukale, instead of those tight little buttons, you get a column of small, frilly, kale heads.

However, I’m told that these smaller kale heads are actually much more tender and the centres are actually soft enough to add to a salad to eat raw.
By the way, in England they’ve changed the name to Kalettes instead of using Brukale.


You might be wondering is Brukale genetically modified?
Brukale or Kalettes were developed by a British seed house (Tozer) following a 15 year breeding program.
This process was entirely natural, using selective breeding and hybridisation only, so definitely no genetic modification.
How To Grow
This growing information is supplied by Ross Geach of the Telegraph newspaper in the UK.
Kalettes should be treated in a similar manner to traditional brassicas, grown in firm ground which is not too acidic.
To grow, it’s best to sow the seed in cell trays, indoors in the middle of the September.
Use a good quality seed raising mix and lightly cover the seeds. Water them well and don’t let them dry out.
Prepare your growing area by digging deep and incorporating some good compost or well rotted manure.
When your seedlings are ready to transplant, if you’re growing heaps, plant them ½ a metre apart with 60cm between rows.
These plants do need a lot of space if you want a good crop of kallettes.
 The plants will gradually drop their leaves.
These leaves are also edible, and can be used in the same way as a kale leaf.
Once all the side leaves have fallen off you should see lots of perfectly formed Kalettes growing all the way up the stalk.
Harvest them straight from the stalk by holding at the base with your finger and thumb, and then gently pulling them to one side so they split from the stalk.
If you want to harvest the whole stalk I suggest using a saw to cut it off at the base because it’s very thick and strong.
Crops grown in acidic soils will benefit from an application of lime or similar.
Trays of Kalletes or Brukale.
Kalettes are extremely winter-hardy, but may need staking to provide additional support during winter months.
How to Cook with Kallettes or Brukale?
Kalettes are a subtler tasting combination of the two great, traditional European flavours of kale and Brussels sprouts.
Known in Australia as Brukale but overseas, it’s commonly called the 'Flower sprout'.
Brukale is highly versatile, with a sweet, nutty flavour.
They can be steamed, used in stir fries, roasted, grilled - or even eaten raw.
Why are they good for you?
Kale is actually near the top of the list in terms of nutritional value, Kale has heaps of antioxidants such as beta-carotene, large amounts of vitamins A, C and E, and heavy doses of calcium, potassium and Kale is particularly rich in iron.
THAT WAS YOUR VEGETABLE HERO FOR TODAY

DESIGN ELEMENTS
Five Senses Gardening: Touch
These days, many people live in high rises and so do their children.
Days, weeks and months can go by when these high rise dwellers don’t make contact with any living plant.
So instead of missing out on the nurturing effect of plants, why not be inspired to bring them into your life?
Let’s find out about what, why and how.
I'm talking with Chris Poulton, Sydney Convenor for the Australian Institute of Horticulture and an experienced horticultural lecturer and consultant.

Get your kids involved with plants like Mimosa pudica, or nerve plant whether in a pot on the balcony or on your back doorstep or patio.
Let them touch the plant and see how it reacts by closing up.
Or if you’re an advanced gardener, perhaps a venus fly trap would suit your sunny windowsill in your house or apartment?
Mimosa pudica : Nerve Plant
There are numerous sensory plants that invite you to feel or just touch them.
Try the felty leaves of Lamb's Ears, or rub the leaves scented geraniums or pelragoniums, 
Feel the rough bark of Casuarinas or Birches, perhaps even an Ironbark Eucalypt.
All of these sensations will awaken our sense of touch.
If you have any questions about five senses gardening or have a suggestion either for me or for Chris why not write in or email me at realworldgardener@gmail.com

TALKING FLOWERS

Fragrance in the garden.
Perfume adds atmosphere and a wonderful feeling of romance to any garden.
The smell of any flower is never really just one single chemical compound. 
Flowers give off a complex mix of volatile organic chemicals, although not all of these will add to the aroma or perfume, a significant number will impact it to varying degrees.
Magnolia champaca will fill your garden with scent all day. Photo M Cannon
Some scentuous suggestions:
Star Jasmine, Tuberoses, Hyacinth, Daffodil, Roses, Carnations, Hydrangeas, Stephanotis, Honeysuckle.

Violets: Their scent is primarily caused by the presence of compounds called ionones.
Interesting fact: We become used to most persistent smells, our brain registers them as constants and phases them out.
This is why you can get used to the smell of a perfume, so that you no longer notice it.
TIP : Change your perfume every few days so that you can refresh your sense of smell.
But for Violets something else is at play.
The ionones in violets’ are different to every other flower because they are able to somehow bypass our sense of smell, binding to the receptors and temporarily desensitising them.
As this shut-down is only temporary, the ionones can soon be detected again, and are registered as a new smell.
Consequently, the scent of the violet appears to disappear — then reappear!
No wonder Napolean chose violets as his favourite flower.

My favourites: Frangipanis, Angel Trumpet, Stephanotis,  Osmanthus, Gardenia, Cherry pie, Buddleia,  native frangipani, Magnolia champaca.
Some of these fill the garden with their scent, particularly at night, others you have to sniff to get the full scent.
I'm talking with Mercedes Sarmini of www.flowersbymercedes.com.au

This video was recorded live during the broadcast of Real World Gardener radio show on 2rrr 88.5 fm in Sydney on Wednesday 29th August at 5pm

Thursday, 6 September 2018

What’s on the show today?

Gardening in dry soil with Diane Watkin in Backyard Biodynamics, a vegetable cross to grow in Vegetable Heroes. Five senses-today’s it’s touch in Design Elements and fragrant flowers in Talking Flowers with floral therapist Mercedes Sarmini.

BACKYARD BIODYNAMICS

Gardening in Dry Soil: How to Make Your Soil Healthy
Is your soil healthy and full of earthworms or is it dry, degraded with no sign of anything living?
When you pick up a handful of soil, what colour is it and does it run through your fingers like sand, or stay in a big clump?
All of these things are important to know but here are some ideas to help improve your dry soil so your plants will be more vigorous and healthy.
Let’s find out .
That was Diane Watkin, co-founder of Biodynamics Sydney.

Neglected soil, degraded soil, sandy soil, all of these possibilities add up to "lifeless dirt."
It's no good putting in a bagful of earthworms because they will surely perish as there is no food for the worms.
To encourage life back into your soil you need to add liquid in the form of compost eat, worm tea, seaweed tea or fish-head tea.
Chelsea Physic Garden photo M Cannon
Also you need to add organic matter in the form of organic or biodynamic compost.
All these things will bring back the microbial life and encourage earthworms to return.
For those gardeners not able to access bio-dynamic compost and any of the preparations Diane talked about, the second best alternative is to use organic compost, especially home-made compost and some sort of seaweed tea, weed tea, or similar.

If you have any questions about improving your soil, either for me or for Diane, why not email realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

VEGETABLE HEROES

Brukale: Kalletes

What do you get when you cross two veggies that have an image problem?
No, not a joke, but it could be.
Do you get a novelty, a passing fad, or a truly hated vegetable?
It could be any of these, you decide.
And you thought there were no more new vegetables.
So today’s veggie is Brukale.
Never heard of it?
Neither had I until I was asked about it.
A bit of research has revealed that it’s a fairly recent cross between Kale and Brussel sprouts.
For all those gardeners that love to eat Kale, good for you, but for others who have grown it and decided it’s not for them because it’s just too tough, this may be of interest.
Then there’s those gardeners that love Brussel sprouts, others that just can’t grow it well, and even others that just don’t like the stuff.
Probably reminds them of overboiled cabbage.
This is really Brukale or Kallettes
What is Brukale really like?
Can you imagine a plant that’s crossed with Brussel sprouts and Kale?
What would it look like?
Think of the actual Brussel sprout plant.
It grows to about one metre tall, with rounded blue-grey leaves that seem to make an umbrella at the top as well as growing along a thick stalk.
Normally you would get tight buttons that look like tiny cabbages, up and down the stem.
With Brukale, instead of those tight little buttons, you get a column of small, frilly, kale heads.

However, I’m told that these smaller kale heads are actually much more tender and the centres are actually soft enough to add to a salad to eat raw.
By the way, in England they’ve changed the name to Kalettes instead of using Brukale.


You might be wondering is Brukale genetically modified?
Brukale or Kalettes were developed by a British seed house (Tozer) following a 15 year breeding program.
This process was entirely natural, using selective breeding and hybridisation only, so definitely no genetic modification.
How To Grow
This growing information is supplied by Ross Geach of the Telegraph newspaper in the UK.
Kalettes should be treated in a similar manner to traditional brassicas, grown in firm ground which is not too acidic.
To grow, it’s best to sow the seed in cell trays, indoors in the middle of the September.
Use a good quality seed raising mix and lightly cover the seeds. Water them well and don’t let them dry out.
Prepare your growing area by digging deep and incorporating some good compost or well rotted manure.
When your seedlings are ready to transplant, if you’re growing heaps, plant them ½ a metre apart with 60cm between rows.
These plants do need a lot of space if you want a good crop of kallettes.
 The plants will gradually drop their leaves.
These leaves are also edible, and can be used in the same way as a kale leaf.
Once all the side leaves have fallen off you should see lots of perfectly formed Kalettes growing all the way up the stalk.
Harvest them straight from the stalk by holding at the base with your finger and thumb, and then gently pulling them to one side so they split from the stalk.
If you want to harvest the whole stalk I suggest using a saw to cut it off at the base because it’s very thick and strong.
Crops grown in acidic soils will benefit from an application of lime or similar.
Trays of Kalletes or Brukale.
Kalettes are extremely winter-hardy, but may need staking to provide additional support during winter months.
How to Cook with Kallettes or Brukale?
Kalettes are a subtler tasting combination of the two great, traditional European flavours of kale and Brussels sprouts.
Known in Australia as Brukale but overseas, it’s commonly called the 'Flower sprout'.
Brukale is highly versatile, with a sweet, nutty flavour.
They can be steamed, used in stir fries, roasted, grilled - or even eaten raw.
Why are they good for you?
Kale is actually near the top of the list in terms of nutritional value, Kale has heaps of antioxidants such as beta-carotene, large amounts of vitamins A, C and E, and heavy doses of calcium, potassium and Kale is particularly rich in iron.
THAT WAS YOUR VEGETABLE HERO FOR TODAY

DESIGN ELEMENTS
Five Senses Gardening: Touch
These days, many people live in high rises and so do their children.
Days, weeks and months can go by when these high rise dwellers don’t make contact with any living plant.
So instead of missing out on the nurturing effect of plants, why not be inspired to bring them into your life?
Let’s find out about what, why and how.
I'm talking with Chris Poulton, Sydney Convenor for the Australian Institute of Horticulture and an experienced horticultural lecturer and consultant.

Get your kids involved with plants like Mimosa pudica, or nerve plant whether in a pot on the balcony or on your back doorstep or patio.
Let them touch the plant and see how it reacts by closing up.
Or if you’re an advanced gardener, perhaps a venus fly trap would suit your sunny windowsill in your house or apartment?
Mimosa pudica : Nerve Plant
There are numerous sensory plants that invite you to feel or just touch them.
Try the felty leaves of Lamb's Ears, or rub the leaves scented geraniums or pelragoniums, 
Feel the rough bark of Casuarinas or Birches, perhaps even an Ironbark Eucalypt.
All of these sensations will awaken our sense of touch.
If you have any questions about five senses gardening or have a suggestion either for me or for Chris why not write in or email me at realworldgardener@gmail.com

TALKING FLOWERS

Fragrance in the garden.
Perfume adds atmosphere and a wonderful feeling of romance to any garden.
The smell of any flower is never really just one single chemical compound. 
Flowers give off a complex mix of volatile organic chemicals, although not all of these will add to the aroma or perfume, a significant number will impact it to varying degrees.
Magnolia champaca will fill your garden with scent all day. Photo M Cannon
Some scentuous suggestions:
Star Jasmine, Tuberoses, Hyacinth, Daffodil, Roses, Carnations, Hydrangeas, Stephanotis, Honeysuckle.

Violets: Their scent is primarily caused by the presence of compounds called ionones.
Interesting fact: We become used to most persistent smells, our brain registers them as constants and phases them out.
This is why you can get used to the smell of a perfume, so that you no longer notice it.
TIP : Change your perfume every few days so that you can refresh your sense of smell.
But for Violets something else is at play.
The ionones in violets’ are different to every other flower because they are able to somehow bypass our sense of smell, binding to the receptors and temporarily desensitising them.
As this shut-down is only temporary, the ionones can soon be detected again, and are registered as a new smell.
Consequently, the scent of the violet appears to disappear — then reappear!
No wonder Napolean chose violets as his favourite flower.

My favourites: Frangipanis, Angel Trumpet, Stephanotis,  Osmanthus, Gardenia, Cherry pie, Buddleia,  native frangipani, Magnolia champaca.
Some of these fill the garden with their scent, particularly at night, others you have to sniff to get the full scent.
I'm talking with Mercedes Sarmini of www.flowersbymercedes.com.au

This video was recorded live during the broadcast of Real World Gardener radio show on 2rrr 88.5 fm in Sydney on Wednesday 29th August at 5pm

Saturday, 1 September 2018

Crabapples, Olives and Budgies


What’s on the show today?

One of Australia’s smallest and most colourful parrots in wildlife in focus, a tree for your produce garden in Vegetable Heroes. A new series on gardening with the senses in Design Elements and abundant flowers on a small tree in Plant of the Week.

WILDLIFE IN FOCUS

Budgerigar Melopsittacus undulatus
If you’ve ever travelled overseas and visited Botanic gardens, often you’ll find that they have a section of what they call exotic plants and or wildlife.
Recently I saw such a place in Ukraine and was rather bemused see that they had quite a few Australian birds and reptiles.

Some of these birds are so colourful that no wonder the local population think that they’re amazing and so exotic.
Let’s find out about one of them.

PLAY: Budgerigar_22nd August 2018
Budgies are closely related to Lorikeets and Figbirds and occur naturally throughout much of mainland Australia.
The places that you won't find them are from the far south-west, the north of the Northern Territory, Tasmania and the majority of the east coast.
Did you know that Budgies come in more than 100 colours, including blue, grey, white, yellow and multicolour. The majority, however, are green, which appears to be their ‘it’ colour, in the wild?

Did you also know that Budgerigars are a boom or bust type of bird and with this current dry season, one can imagine that there would be quite a number of fatalities?
However, recent research from Curtin University have discovered the fact that, much like mammals, budgies (Melopsittacus undulatus) have the ability to regulate the water they lose through their skin.
Their suggestion is that they can cope well in hot dry conditions.
The question is “but for how long.”

If you have any questions about Budgies of the bird kind either for me or for Holly, why not email realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR P.O. Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

VEGETABLE HEROES

Olives or Olea europeae. 

The olive tree is a symbol of joy, peace and happiness.

Did you know that the Mediterranean diet which includes plenty of olives and olive oil has long been known as one of the healthiest?

Another interesting fact is that residents of Crete in the Mediterranean have the highest consumption of olive oil per person in the world but Australia is second; the Cretians though have the lowest rate of death from heart related diseases in the world which we can’t say about our diet yet. 

Olive trees can look good in any garden with their silver grey-green leaves.

Some people have mistakenly bought ornamental olive trees thinking that they will also fruit, but that’s not the case.

These ornamental olives have darker green leaves and only produce pea sized fruit which isn’t much good.

The good news is that true olives can grow right from Queensland through to Tasmania and across to South Australia.

Not only that, olives can grow with neglect and start producing fruit again with a bit of care plus they make excellent wind breaks and great for gardeners with black thumbs.

What Do Olive Trees Really Like?

We have to remember that the olive originated in the Mediterranean region and will grow well in areas of Australia with a similar climate—cool/cold winters and hot summers.

Even though olives are evergreen trees, they still need a cool winter so they can rest to prepare for their main shooting.
Many mature olive trees will survive and crop well even in the very cold areas of Australia.
Some varieties will also fruit well in 'no frost' areas as long as the winters are cool enough;

Winter chilling is needed; winter temperatures fluctuating between

1.5°C and 18°C and summers long and warm enough to ripen the fruit.

Having said that, the olive industry in Australia has been doing research into what olives do well in warm winters and wet summers. 

Warm Winter Olive Varieties
Some of these are warm winter varieties include: Arbequina, Arecuzzo, Barnea, Del Morocco, Koroneiki, Manzanillo and Picual.
Tip: If you already have an olive tree and experienced very few olives; hot, dry winds or rain at pollination time in late spring can reduce fruit set..

How To Grow Olive Trees

Olives will grow in most soil types as long as they are well-drained and have a subsoil pH range of 6.5–8.5.

TIP: The olive three’s worst enemy is too much water.

If your soil holds too much water when there’s been a lot of rain, then you need to improve the drainage or raise the bed that your olive tree is growing in.

When it comes to fertilising, olive trees have similar needs to Australian eucalypts except for the fact that they’re not phosphorous sensitive.

Traditionally all you need to use to fertilise your olive trees are well rotted manures and mulches; anything else and you risk over fertilising your trees.

Problems with Olive trees.
  • Lots of rain at harvest-time, can reduce oil content due to the higher water content in the fruit. 
  • The most common pest is black scale, which also affects citrus. 
  • Olive lace bug (not to be confused with beneficial lace wings) can also be a problem. 
  • All of these pests can be controlled, but they should be positively identified . If you’re not sure what’s attacking your tree, take a piece of the affected branch to your local garden centre. 
  • Don’t go off spraying with one of those broadspectrum or home-made insecticides that kill beneficial insects as well.. 
  • The main fungal problem is peacock spot, which results in leaf fall and poor fruit set:It’s more common in humid areas. 
  • You need to prune to allow enough air flow through the leaves to help keep it under control. 
  • Anthracnose, or fruit rot, can also affect olives. 
  • Copper sprays can be used for (any both of these) fungal diseases. 
  • Olives are also harmed by some soil-borne pathogens such as phytophthora, verticillium and nematodes common to other fruit trees. 
  • If that still doesn’t put you off growing them, here’s part of what you have to do to preserve olives. 
Harvesting Olives
In about February - March, some of the fruit begins to turn from plain green to purplish black.
When some of the olives begin to change towards black, it will be fairly safe to pick the green olives for pickling

If you have ever tried to eat an olive straight from the tree, you will know what I mean - it's VERY bitter and VERY hard.

If you use the method I’m going to talk about, you’ll end up with wonderful sweet olives and you can add all sorts of herb combinations to create your own special marinated olives.

•Make a slit in each olive or crack each one open carefully with a wooden mallet. THAT’S RIGHT, EACH AND EVERY SINGLE ONE!

This bruising, pricking or cutting will allow the water and salt to penetrate the fruit, drawing out the bitterness and also preserving it

•Put the olives in a large bowl or bucket and cover with water with ½ cup of coarse salt for every 10 cups of water.


Place a plate over the top to keep the olives submerged.

•Change the water daily for about 10 -12 days to extract the bitterness and make the olives "sweet".

Test an olive to see if all the bitterness is gone. Ugghhh, yes you have to.

•After 14 days, drain the olives and place in a solution of cooled down brine; 1 cup of salt for every 10 cups of water that has been boiled together first.

Then all that’s left is bottling the olives in brine topped up with 1 cm of olive oil.

There are other recipes involving wood ash.

By the way, olives will keep for years in the freezer.

Why are they good for you?

Olives are nutritious and rich in mineral content as sodium, potassium, magnesium, iron, phosphorus and iodine
Olives provide essential vitamins and amino acids. Olives contain oleic acid, which has beneficial properties to protect the heart.

PLANT OF THE WEEK

 Malus floribunda, Crabapple

Flowers on this tree are so spectacular that you’ll be wondering why you’ve never planted it in your garden.
Not only that, it’s easy to grow, is a small tree and is quite hardy.
But maybe you have one in your garden, and you’ve had it for years.
So instead you’re the envy of neighbours all around you but they’ve been either too afraid to ask you what it is or have been trying to sneak cuttings.

Crabapple Tree. Photo M Cannon
I'm talking with the plant panel were Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au 
Let’s find out about this plant.

PLAY: Malus floribunda Wychwood Ruby"_22nd August (30th August_2017)

There’s quite a few other varieties of crabapples to choose from with enticing names like Sugar Tyme Showtime, Royal Raindrops and Golden Raindrops.

The bonus is even though it’s a small ornamental tree, you get these crab apples and if you’re into masterchef or other cooking shows, you’ll be wanting to make crab apple jelly to use on your cooking creations.

If you have any questions about growing crab apple trees, why not write in to realworldgardener@gmail.com


Saturday, 28 July 2018

Exploring the Senses in Gardening

What’s On The Show Today?

Part 2 of garden toolboxes in the tool time segment and it’s not what you think,; growing no ordinary mint in Vegetable Heroes, 5 senses gardening in Design Elements with landscape designer Chris Poulton, plus scented flowers in winter in plant of the week;

TOOL TIME

Tools for the Advanced and Mature Gardener

Over the years, gardeners accumulate quite a number of tools that they regard as essential and wouldn’t be without.
Last week we talked about what you might need if you were a beginner or slightly more advanced gardener.
Cut Above Tools
So now we’re going for tools with more oomph and powered by more than your muscle power.
The reason is that it’s the experienced and the mature gardener that’s getting a look in.
Let’s find out what the experts recommend.
I'm talking with Tony Mattson General Manager of www.cutabovetools.com.au


What do you think, do you agree with Tony’s advanced gardener’s tool kit or would you have chosen something else?

If you haven’t already, it’s probably time to buy a pair of ratchet secateurs (sek-a terrs) to add to your toolbox. Ratchet secateurs are great for pruning shrubs.
Mature gardeners might want gear action loppers
If you have any questions either for me or Tony, you can email us Realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2rrr, PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675.

VEGETABLE HEROES

No Ordinary Mint: Vietnamese Mint

Vietnamese mint, Persicaria odorata.
Any time is a great time to be growing mints of all kinds, but this one is particularly good.
And…..Vietnamese mint isn’t actually a mint, nor is it in the mint family-Lamiaceae but in a family called Polygonaceae which is the same for buckwheat and rhubarb.

Botanical Bite

In botany, mint is the common name for any of the various herbaceous plants that have a botanical name starting with Mentha, in the mint family Lamiaceae.
Flowers of Vietnamese Mint
These mints have wide-spreading, underground rhizomes; erect, square, branched stems; and pairs of oppositely arranged leaves; and small, tubular flowers arranged in clusters.
Only the members of Mentha are known as the "true mints," some plants in same family but aren’t true mints, use mint in their common name.
But one things for sure and that is the entire family is known as the mint family.
In comes some other plants with fragrant leaves that have the common name of mint associated.
Vietnamese mint is one of these. Not a true mint and again, not even in the mint family.
Odorata simply means fragrant which this plant is
This so called mint is a herb that’s used a lot in Asian cuisine, and funnily enough, it grows easily, much like other mints.
How to use Vietnamese mint and other interesting facts.

The leaves are used fresh in salads, soups and stews.
In Singapore, the shredded leaf is an essential ingredient in laksa, a spicy soup.
Here’s a funny fact-did you know that some Buddhist monks grow Vietnamese mint in their private gardens and eat it often as a helpful step in their celibate life?
Vietnamese mint has an essential oil called kesom oil.
This oil is used a lot in the processed food industry where it’s used in the form of a natural food essence.
The cosmetic industry also uses kesom oil.
So what does it look like?

It’s a creeping herbaceous perennial that grows up to 30cm with a flavour that is a mix of pepper, mint and lemon.
The leaves are very narrow and angular looking and the stems are jointed much like wandering Jew which is now called Tradescantia.
The old genus name Poly­gonum (English: knot­weed) pointed to way the stem looked, - many joints linked together by slightly bent “knots” or “knees”

The top of the leaf is dark green, with chestnut-coloured dark rounded markings right across the leaf, and the underside is burgundy red.
When it flowers is has flat spikes of light lavender coloured flowers, but I can’t say mine has ever flowered.
In originates in Vietnam where it’s found in the wild in wet and boggy places.

Where it Grows
It can grow very well outside in summer in non-tropical parts of Australia.
Vietnamese mint prefers part-sun and well-drained soil.
For those areas with cool to cold winter, bring your Vietnamese mint indoors or under shelter as you would an indoor plant.
It grows very well in pots but is frost tender.
Tip: If you’re growing them in pots, once Vietnamese gets pot bound, it’ll stop producing leaves giving you a big hint to repot and divide it up.
Vietnamese mint rarely flowers outside the tropics, but it’s the leaves you want to use and not the flowers.
Vietnamese mint is normally fairly low maintenance and is easy to grow, as long as you give it a basic level of basic care.
All you need to do is keep it well watered and cut back to the ground when
leaves become tough to produce more fresh young leaves.
Vietnamese mint is a perennial plant that grows best in tropical and subtropical zones in warm and damp conditions.
But all gardeners like a challenge even if it the growing conditions aren’t ideal.
In good conditions, it can grow up to 15 to 30 cm.
In summer or when the temperature is too high, it does wilt.
If you know someone with this plant ask for some cuttings from a mature clump.
These mints are so hardy!
They will tolerate any soil conditions and even people stomping on them (by accident of course, or chickens trying to dig the plant up).
They don't need constant fertilising or watering but do like shading from the hottest part of the day.
Try planting Vietnamese mint if you'd like to attract butterflies and bees to your garden for tropical gardens of course.
So what do you do with Vietnamese Mint.
The fresh leaf is used typically in Vietnamese cooking and can be used in
place of Coriander in all Asian cooking, soups, salads and fish.
It can also be dried.
Vietnamese Mint Lemonade
You can even make Vietnamese Mint lemonade.
Just place some sugar in the bottom of a large jug.
Add ice, 1 cup of lemon juice, then slices of lemon, a handful of mint and top up with about 2 litres of mineral water.
Very refreshing.

Why is it good for you?
 Vietnamese mint contains high levels of Beta-carotene and vitamin E:
Also has high levels of folic acid, iron and calcium.
Mint leaves also have useful healing properties.
Mints can freshen breath, soothe the stomach and reduce inflammation. Mint leaves are not as potent as concentrated mint oil, but they still have many of the same health benefits.
AND THAT WAS OUR VEGETABLE HERO SEGMENT FOR TODAY!

DESIGN ELEMENTS

Introduction to 5 Sense Gardening

Have you ever thought about the five senses when you think about your garden?
Probably not, but the best way to enjoy your garden is to engage all the senses.
Today we are going to talk about these senses and how to recognise and use them on a daily basis in small and large gardens.

Touch, Smell, Sight, Hearing, Taste are of course the 5 sense, so how do we incorporate these into garden design so each particular sense is invigorated.
Let’s find out about what, why and how.
I'm talking with Chris Poulton, Convener for the Australian Institute of Horticulture, and experienced Horticultural Lecture and Consultant.

Most gardens just have visual appeal, but you’ll enjoy your garden more if there are other
If you have any questions about five senses gardening or have a suggestion either for me or for Chris why not write in or email me at www.realworldgardener.com

PLANT OF THE WEEK

Luculia gratissima

The shrub featured this week is an old fashioned shrubs but with outstanding features.
And just like undersized potatoes or oversized apples, they who make decision in the big stores that sell plants, have decided that they won’t be available to the home gardener.
So if you’re looking for a winter flower shrub or small tree with masses of pink fragrant flowers, this one’s for you?
Luculia gratissima
Let’s find out more…
I'm talking with the plant panel: Karen Smith, editor of Hort Journal www.hortjournal.com.au and Jeremy Critchley, The Green Gallery wholesale nursery owner. www.thegreengallery.com.au
PLAY: Luculia_18th July 2018 (7th June_2017)

While the flowers make an impressive display, the leaves not so much.
The foliage shall we say get’s a little untidy, but gardeners grow it for the flowers not the leaves.
You can prune mature Luculias quite hard to tidy them up, should you be lucky enough to have one growing in your garden.

If you have a question either for me or the plant panel why not drop us a line to realworldgardener@gmail.com or write in to 2RRR PO Box 644 Gladesville NSW 1675